Jim Kazanjian



{I am interested in a kind of ‘entropic’ image”an image that has the capacity to de-familiarize itself. My current work is an attempt to unravel the photograph and play with established notions of time and space, notwithstanding our understanding of what gives things context. Through fragmentation and re-composition of the photographic space, the non-linear nature of reading the image is folded in on itself. The structure of the photograph is unwound and reshuffled. This reshaping is an iterative process that spurs a generation of something altogether different; something ineffable.} http://artistaday.com



CORPSE FLOWER


{A foul smelling plant known as the "corpse flower" is finally blooming at the New York Botanical Garden in New York City.


Visitors were waiting in line more than an hour to see the rare bloom. It started emerging Thursday afternoon after more than 10 years of growth.

It's native to Sumatra's equatorial rain forests and emits an odor like rotting flesh while it's briefly in bloom.

It's one of the largest flowers on earth and can reach 6 feet in height. It emits the stench to attract pollinators.

The bloom at its peak only lasts about 24 to 36 hours — and it could be years before the flower blooms again.} READ MORE HERE

Tomohiro Inaba


{Tomohiro Inaba is a young artist who finished his graduate studies in 2010.


He is attracted to iron as a material among other reasons because it begins to rust and decay upon contact with air, practically the moment it is created. For some his two-dimensional work he has used heat-sensitive paper, a likewise ephemeral material.

Inaba often incorporates everyday objects into his work. His Straight Grass series consisted of household refuse exhibited in bespoke frames.


Though made from solid iron wire, many of his sculptures appear freely woven. Their foundation is an anatomically correct solid form but it shoots off in incredibly complex tangles of steel wire that manifest themselves like violent pencil scribbles.} ARTISTADAY.COM

JUGHEAD BEAR


{GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo., July 22 (UPI) -- The owner of a Colorado bed and breakfast lassoed and wrestled with a 2-year-old black bear to free the animal's head from a plastic jug of Cheese Balls.
Jim Hawkins, owner of Four Mile Creek Bed and Breakfast outside of Glenwood Springs, said the bear had been spotted numerous times during the past week with the clear plastic Cheese Balls container on its head, but it always wandered away before authorities arrived.

The 100-pound bear was estimated to be about 2 years old.

"He was just a little bear with a big problem," Hawkins told the Glenwood Springs Post Independent. "He was a 2-year-old with a space helmet on."} READ MORE HERE


AMERICAN HOTEL: LA ARTS DISTRICT

If you're graffiti hunting in Downtown LA make sure you stop by the American Hotel, and see this beauty up close! Here are few pics I took until you do!


MURAL CREATED BY EL MAC x KOFIE x  Joseph Manuel Montalvo


American Hotel
303 S. Hewitt Street
Los Angeles, California, 90013, United States
(213) 545-4695

Ted Talks: William Kamkwamba


{To power his family's home, young William Kamkwamba built an electricity-producing windmill from spare parts and scrap — starting him on a journey detailed in the book and film "The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind."


William Kamkwamba, from Malawi, is a born inventor. When he was 14, he built an electricity-producing windmill from spare parts and scrap, working from rough plans he found in a library book called Using Energy and modifying them to fit his needs. The windmill he built powers four lights and two radios in his family home.}- READ MORE HERE

In 2013 TIME magazine named Kamkwamba one of the "30 People Under 30 Changing The World."

AYE-AYE!


{The aye-aye is the world's largest nocturnal primate. It is characterized by its unusual method of finding food; it taps on trees to find grubs, then gnaws holes in the wood using its forward slanting incisors to create a small hole in which it inserts its narrow middle finger to pull the grubs out.} READ MORE

PHOTO FROM PHYS.ORG